Ethnobotany


01-13-2016
Nettle Leaf ( Urica dioica )
nettle leaf
In traditional Austrian medicine, it's consumed internally for the treatment of disorders related to the kidneys and urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, locomotor system, skin, cardiovascular health, hemorrhage, flu, rheumatism, and even gout.

01-13-2016
Red Clover (Trifolium pratense)
red clover
Red Clover was traditionally used in China and Russia to treat respiratory infections, congestion, coughs, speed would healing and improve water retention.




Maca Root - Bow Chicka Wow Wow
Stimulate blood flow to the areas that matter.



















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Aphrodisiac Bulrush Love Reed Typha capensis

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Origins: South Africa

Habitat: Wet and Swampy Areas. Organic Hydroponic-like Environments.

Parts used: Roots ( rhizomes ), leaves, seeds, pollen. All parts of the plant are used.[1]

Properties and Applications: libido health, sexual tonic, improves circulation, anti-bacterial, diuretic, astringent, desiccant, diuretic, haemostatic and vulnerary, nose bleeds, haematesmesis, haematuria, uterine bleeding, dysmenor-rhoea, postpartum abdominal pain and gastralgia, scrofula and abscesses, venereal diseases.[1]


                  I couldn't help but notice that this page on the Bulrush plant was one of my top viewed, liked, and shared pages on this entire website. Because of this, I decided to write an entire new page dedicated to Bulrush, also known as the "Love Reed", and scientifically known as Typha capensis. I wanted to look further into the plant and see what it is that makes it so popular.


There are a lot of interesting academic facts on the Bulrush medicine that are not commonly discussed on the world wide web. According to research conducted by the University of Limpopo in Sovenga, South Africa, "Some extracts were active against Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis, with at least one of them exhibiting minimum inhibitory concentration values of 0.04 mg/ml."[1] That's E. COLI were talking about! A plant that grows like mad on its own is capable of defeating E. Coli? Who would have ever thought? The truth is that plants contain pharmacological compounds of such a complex and impressive nature that the drug companies are probably jealous of nature, while simultaneously arrogant, greedy, and foolish enough to attempt to compete with it.


As I've stated on this blog many times, too many people will confidently tell you things are are not correct. One of the most common misleading statements out there is that there is no scientific inquiry in to the medicinal properties of plants. Fortunately, we have an entire branch of chemistry dedicated to this type of research, and it's called phytochemistry.[3] We've all heard of phytosynthesis right? Notice something the two terms have in common? They both start with "phyto", indicating their relation. Even some professors will tell you that plant based medicine is bogus! At the same time, phytochemistry is being taught at the very establishment that they work for! The paradox of academic ignorance is all too amusing. Redefine intelligence everyone. I apologize for digressing.


"The leaves are diuretic (Duke and Ayensu, 1985). The pollen is astringent(tends to shrink or constrict body tissues), desiccant, diuretic(increases or promotes urination), haemostatic(stops bleeding) and vulnerary (Duke and Ayensu, 1985). It's also used in the treatment of nose bleeds, haematemesis, haematuria, uterine bleeding, dysmenor-rhoea(painful menstruation, typically involving abdominal cramps.), postpartum abdominal pain and gastralgia(stomach pain), scrofula(Mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis) and abscesses (Yeung, 1985). The seed is haemostatic (Duke and Ayensu, 1985). The rootstock is astringent and diuretic (Chopra et al., 1986)."[1] So we can see that it does have far more use than just an Aphrodisiac. To the mainstream though, its other medicinal properties and the scientific inquiry into its pharmacological constituents is quite unknown. After researching hundreds of medicinal plants, it comes as no surprise to me to find one with so much potential in assisting our human biology in the process of healing.


"While it's mostly used as an aphrodisiac, it's also made into decoctions to treat venereal diseases." The synchornization that it's used as both a way to stimulate sexuality, and to treat an STD is humorous . "Decoctions of Bulrush are also used for stomach ailments and to promote fertility in both women and men. They are also useful for improving circulation."([1] Watt and Breyer-Brandwijk, 1962; Hutchings et al., 1996). So by helping your circulation, the medicinal qualities of the herb are helping the blood flow to the area that matters, if ya catch my drift. There's more to it than that though. Research has also shown that the phytosteroids in Typha capensis may be metabolized by the body resulting in the creation of an adrogen that's beneficial to male sex drive and performance.[2] In other words, it's not just the circulation benefits that make it an aphrodisiac, it's bio- chemical too.


Making Bulrush into a tincture or spagyric can get you the most possible out of the medicine. Sense they are made without using heat, and the high proof alcohol is capable of extracting oils and non-polar alkaloids (which water can not), it's one of the best options in general. It can be taken a step further by extracting the plant salts from the remaining ashes in alcohol. That's what would make it a spagyric instead of a tincture, among other things. "Traditionally it was boiled into a tea in Africa using the rhizomes. The tea is boiled for a few minutes and consumed as needed. The dosage is suggested by holistic practitioners is typically one or two cups daily for a week, and then maybe once a week as needed."[2]


Many other plants have been researched and backed by science by herbalist, phytochemist and other researchers world wide. It's no folk lore that these plants do show promise in the way of being medicine. In fact, much of the modern pharmaceutical drugs today are based off of these herbs. A lot of these drugs are straight up extracted compounds from plants. Some examples include Aspirin, which is made from the bark of the White Willow Tree, Morphine, which is extracted from the Opium Poppy, and even Penicilin, which comes from a fungus that grows on oranges.


I'm still not sure why the original Bulrush page that I put together is getting more attention than most of the others. There is generally enough scientific inquiry behind most plants to explain their properties, so it's not that its more researched or proven effective. It must just be really popular as a very effective aphrodisiac. Bulrush is mostly marketed and advertised as an aphrodisiac. Now you have gained an insight into more of the medicinal qualities this plant has to offer. These facts are little to non-existent in articles around the web.

Bulrush Herb For Sale Here!

Organic Wild Harvested Bulrush ( Love Reed ) From South Africa.

By viewing this webiste or placing an order you are by default agreeing to our site disclaimer.

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INFORMATION PROVIDED ON OUR WEBSITE IS FOR BOTANICAL/CULTURAL RESEARCH PURPOSES ONLY! ANY REFERENCES ABOUT THE USE OR EFFECTS OF THESE NATURAL HEALING HERBS IS BASED ON TRADITIONAL USE OR SHAMANIC PRACTICES. ALL PRODUCTS ARE SOLD FOR ETHNOBOTANICAL RESEARCH (CONSULT YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER)! STATEMENTS AND ITEMS ARE NOT EVALUATED OR APPROVED BY THE FDA. NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, PREVENT, OR CURE, ANY AILMENTS, CONDITIONS, DISEASES, ETC.

References:

[1] African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 7 (20), pp. 3743-3748, 20 October, 2008 Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB ISSN 1684\965315 via www.ajol.info/index.php/ajb/article/download/59423/47717

[2] Bouncing Bear Botanicals

[3] Phytochemistry. (2016, July 3). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 22:46, August 10, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Phytochemistry&oldid=728083047


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