Gotu Kola Centella asiatica Medicinal Properties Phytochemistry
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Gotu Kola Centella asiatica

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gotu kola Centella asiatica

Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica)

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Gotu Kola Uses Benefits:

Anti-anxiety, anti stress, concentration, memory, depression, mental fatigue, blood purifier, detoxifier, skin conditions.

           Gotu Kola is comparable to Ginkgo Biloba as it has many of the same benefits. This herb is believed to improve concentration by guarding blood vessels that supply oxygen to the brain. Clinical studies have backed up its benefits, although it has not been evaluated or approved by the FDA. The effects of Gotu Kola on the brain are stimulating. The herb is thought to help revitalize the nervous system and immune system, both detoxifying and fueling the fine mechanics of the human body.


Phytochemical research on Gotu Kola has shown that it contains riterpenoid, and saponins.[2] These phytochemicals are very common in medicinal plants. It also has been used in holistic health practices for multiple skin conditions, leprosy, lupus, psoriasis, varicose ulcers, eczema, diarrhoea(yikes!), fever, amenorrhea, female genitourinary tract and for lowering anxiety and improving cognition.[2] The species, also contains the constituent known as Centelloside.[2] Centelloside is literally named after the scientific name of the plant. It and its derivative constituents are shown to be effective in the treatment of venous hypertension. Hypertension is abnormal levels of high blood pressure.[2]


Gotu Kola is even used as a culinary herb in some cultures.[1] It also has been used by herbalist for a condition known as strangury. [1] Strangury is in a nutt-shell, painful, frequent urination of small volumes. It also contains asiaticoside, brahmoside, asiatic acid, and brahmic acid (madecassic acid). Other pharmacological constituents include centellose, centelloside, and madecassoside. Both the leaf and root of the herb are used in herbal preparations. When using the root, a decoction is made by boiling the root for an extended period of time. If using the leaf, a simple tea is found to be effective.


Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica) itself acts as an ingenious chemist. It uses the suns energy, combines it with oxygen and water from the biosphere, and creates remarkably complicated organic compounds. There isn't a single human chemist on the planet that can do this. Herbal medicine has been effective in ancient cultures. In modern times phytochemistry conducts scientific research on these remedies. Phytochemistry is a branch of chemistry that peers beneath the surface of the organic plant matter. They locate, extract, and research the organic chemicals produced by nature, and the effects that they posses.


Dosages: Herbalists recommend around two grams daily with a meal.

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INFORMATION PROVIDED ON OUR WEBSITE IS FOR BOTANICAL/CULTURAL RESEARCH PURPOSES ONLY! ANY REFERENCES ABOUT THE USE OR EFFECTS OF THESE NATURAL HEALING HERBS IS BASED ON TRADITIONAL USE OR SHAMANIC PRACTICES. ALL PRODUCTS ARE SOLD FOR ETHNOBOTANICAL RESEARCH (CONSULT A HEALTHCARE PROVIDER)! STATEMENTS AND ITEMS ARE NOT EVALUATED OR APPROVED BY THE FDA.


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References & Resources:

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3116297/

Singh B. and Rastogi, R. P. 1969. A reinvestigation of the triterpenes of Centella Asiatica. Phytochemistry 8: 917-921.

Singh, B. and Rastogi, R.P. 1968. Chemical examination of Centalla Asiatica Linn - III. Constitution of brahmic acid. Phytochemistry 7: 1385-1393. doi:10.1016/S0031-9422(00)85642-3

Murray, edited by Joseph E. Pizzorno, Jr., Michael T. (2012). Textbook of natural medicine (4th ed.). Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. p. 650. ISBN 9781437723335

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[1] Centella asiatica. (2017, August 12). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 22:37, November 1, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Centella_asiatica&oldid=795105456

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