Ethnobotany

03/27/17
Growing Hawaiian Baby Woodrose
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Learn the right way to grow Hawaiian Baby Woodrose from seeds and cuttings. These plants require slightly different techniques than most plants. Avoid failure by reading this article.
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Entheogenic Inebriating Mint Lagochilus inebrians

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intoxicating mint species  Lagochilus inebrians

Inebriating Mint (Lagochilus inebrians)

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Medicinal properties and applications: anti-hemorrhagic, hemostatic, and aid in blood coagulation, allergies, skin conditions, sedative.

Psychoactive properties: Intoxicant

Phytochemical constituents: Lagochilin ( note: stay tuned for updates )

There seems to be a lot of controversy about Lagochilus inebrians. One thing that is un-questionable is the scientifically inquiry conducted by Russian researchers, who have taken an interest in and gained insight on the herbs pharmacological value.[1(Schultes, Hofmann 1979 47)] The results were that like many other wild botanicals, "inebriating mint" does in fact have medicinal qualities. It has anti-hemorrhagic, and hemostatic properties, can aid in blood coagulation, allergies, skin conditions, and acts as a sedative.[1(Schultes, Hofmann 1979 47)]


The Inebrating mint ( Lagochilus inebrians ) plant is well known in certain parts of the world. In the United States, very few people use it, or have even heard of it. We are fortunate that it remains legal. The true controversy regarding this little known plant that was traditionally used as an intoxicant is whether or not it actually induces inebriation. According to the book "Plants Of The Gods", written by Richard Schultes and Albert Hofmann, two of the most famous and educated people on the planet in the way of chemistry, ethnobotany, and psychedelic drugs, "in Turkestan, the Tajfik, Tartar, Turkoman, and Ubek tribesmen like to use it as an intoxicant".[1(Schultes, Hofmann 1979 47)] For these cultures, there is no question because they know from experience. To many people in the west though, scientific proof is needed before they will even try.

Lagochilin

It's not like there isn't scientific inquiry into plants in general. We have an entire branch of chemistry that revolves around finding out what makes them work, and its called phytochemistry.[2] We as human beings actually learn from plants like Lagochilus inebrians. The problem is that Inebriating mint, or Lagochilus inebrians, has been kept on such a low key by those who admire its properties. Because of this it hasn't been looked at too often in the world of higher education. If researchers in Russia were interested in the medicinal qualities of the plant, then I'd like to see other researchers conduct studies on this herb so we can share their findings with the world. Of course, the most effective and hands on research is to try it yourself.


When we consider that Catnip is a narcotic to cats, and that it's in the same family as Mint, and so too is Lagochilus inebrians ( hints the name Inebriating mint ), it seems beyond evident that this is in fact a plausible claim. I just wanted to touch base on the controversy on this herb because there is very little information about it on the internet and a lot of people are wondering if it works, and if there is any truth behind the claims circulating. Yes, it does have an ethnobotanical history of use as an intoxicating plant, and this has been confirmed by Richard Schultes and Albert Hoffman.


Some more evidence that this form of intoxicating mint is really what traditional cultures claim it to be is that in ancient Central Asian tribes consumed it during feast, holidays, and other traditional celebrations.[3] Consuming something during a celebration is usually something that has a psychoactive or intoxicating nature, like alcohol, or Marijuana. I will add to this page eventually, and include an experience report.

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Scientific Name Lagochilus Inebrians

Inebriating Mint For Sale Here!

People who were interested in this botanical were also interested in: Grow Gear, Akuamma seed, speciosa Alternatives!, Echinacea, & Camphor Bush.

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INFORMATION PROVIDED ON OUR WEBSITE IS FOR BOTANICAL/CULTURAL RESEARCH PURPOSES ONLY! ANY REFERENCES ABOUT THE USE OR EFFECTS OF THESE NATURAL HEALING HERBS IS BASED ON TRADITIONAL USE OR SHAMANIC PRACTICES. ALL PRODUCTS ARE SOLD FOR ETHNOBOTANICAL RESEARCH (CONSULT YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDER)! STATEMENTS AND ITEMS ARE NOT EVALUATED OR APPROVED BY THE FDA. NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, PREVENT, OR CURE ANY AILMENT, CONDITION, DISEASE, ETC.

References & Resources:

[1] Schultes, R. E., & Hofmann, A. (1979). Plants of the gods: Origins of hallucinogenic use. New York: McGraw-Hill.

[2] Phytochemistry. (2016, July 3). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 00:02, August 12, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Phytochemistry&oldid=728083047

[3] Bouncing Bear Botanicals

Additional resources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagochilin


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