Holistic Health

02/11/16
Maeng Da
Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) has been banned in several states just like Khat, another stimulant plant that was outlawed back in 1993. The difference is that Kratom also works like an opiate. It has never killed anyone.

02/11/16
Frankincense (Boswellia carteri)
frankincense resin
Frankincense is prized for its essential oils which are believed to be medicinal and energetic. Oils are also used in the production of cosmetics and perfumes. Clinical aromatherapy uses it for skin diseases, respiratory and urinary tract infections, rheumatism, and even syphilis.

Lavender Buds Lavandula officinalis

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Scientific Name: Lavandula officinalis

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Medicinal use: insomnia, nervous stomach, anxiety, diabetes, flatulence, colic, depressive headaches, expectorant, expelling worms, nerves, DNA protection, tranquilizer, blood sugar. [1,2,3]

                 Lavender is an incredibly aromatic flowering herb that produces what appears to be buds, not unlike that from Cannabis. The buds have miniature flowers growing out of them, as seen in the picture above on the left. They have an appearance that is out of this world! They are far out! There are different varieties of Lavender as well. The plant has many medicinal qualities that I will discuss below.


The aromatic properties of Lavender are used in the treatment of insomnia, nervous stomach symptoms, and anxiety.[3] In Spain, it's added to teas for treating diabetes and insulin resistance.[3] This sort of treatment has to be done so with precise dosages. The British Herbal Pharmacopoeia list this herb as a treatment for flatulence, colic, and depressive headaches, adding to its already impressive list of benefits.[3]


Some of you may be wondering how this can possibly be. How can a flower work like a medicine? I have a one word answer to offer you, and it's phytochemistry. If you've browsed this website before then you may even be tired of hearing about it. I'll sum it up for the newbies to Botanical Guides. Phytochemistry is the study of the pharmacological alkaloids that plants produce.


Oils can be extracted by soaking the plant matter in everclear (75+% Alcohol) for a minimum of one month. This is called a tincture. Oils can also be isolated and captured using steam distillation yet this is a more costly approach. These methods extract and utilize more constituents than a typical tea preparation. These types of extraction methods are a favorite by professional alternative healers.


Lots of different cultures have found their own medicinal applications for Lavender. "The Arabs found it to be a useful expectorant. Pilgrims used the seeds to expel worms. Studies indicate that the essential oils can reduce the flow of nerve impulses. The Perillyl compound may promote the apoptosis process, thus protecting DNA. Another study suggest its scent alone is just as effective of a tranquilizer as others. Further research indicates that it may lower blood sugar." [ 1 paragraph (Swerdlow 2000 365) ]


These studies related to Lavender and its medicinal qualities are academic. When you take the time to do the research for yourself, you'll notice that people are constantly repeating things they hear that are not true. You'll hear things like, "There is no scientific evidence to support plant based medicine", and other related nonsensical mantras. The truth is most people have simply not taken the time to do the research, so they really wouldn't know.



Non-GMO Organic Lavender; Scientific Name Lavandula officinalis

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By viewing this page you are by default agreeing to this sites disclaimer.
lavender buds

INFORMATION PROVIDED ON OUR WEBSITE IS FOR BOTANICAL/CULTURAL RESEARCH PURPOSES ONLY! ANY REFERENCES ABOUT THE USE OR EFFECTS OF THESE NATURAL HEALING HERBS IS BASED ON TRADITIONAL USE OR SHAMANIC PRACTICES. ALL PRODUCTS ARE SOLD FOR ETHNOBOTANICAL RESEARCH (CONSULT A HEALTHCARE PROVIDER)! NOT EVALUATED OR APPROVED BY THE FDA.

References:

[1] Swerdlow, J. L. (2000). Nature's medicine: Plants that heal. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society.

[2] Lavandula angustifolia. (2014, March 29). The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 15:35, August 29, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lavandula_angustifolia&oldid=601741606

[3] Bouncing Bear


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