Botanicals

03/08/2016
Green Vein Borneo
kratom
Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a member of the Coffee tree family. This plant contains many of the same alkaloids found in Chocolate and a series of alkaloids that effect the human opioid receptors.

03/08/2016
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frankincense resin
Frankincense is prized for its essential oils which are medicinal and energetic. Oils are also used in the production of cosmetics and perfumes. Clinical aromatherapy uses for skin diseases, respiratory and urinary tract infections, rheumatism, and even syphilis.
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Maca Lepidium meyenii

ethnobotany

lepidium meyenii  Maca

Lepidium meyenii (Maca)

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Botanical Guides

Introduction

                    Maca has a vast and historic reputation as a medicinal plant. Cultures around the world have made use of it in many ways over the centuries. Modern science even has an interest in Maca. They have discovered and researched many phytochemicals of a pharmacological nature. You'll discover with further research, that the historic applications of these medicinal herbs are endless. So too is the pharmacological value of them as well.

Medicinal Properties

Energy, Vitality, Libido & Fertility, Endurance, Menopause, Menstruation, Skincare, Depression, Mood, Stamina, Male Potency, Anemia, Leukemia, CFS, Athletic Performance, Memory, Infertility, Osteoporosis, Stomach Cancer, AIDS, Immune Support, and more.

Classification


Aphrodisiac, Adaptogen, and more.

Ethnobotany History Culture


                    First of all, ethnobotany is the study of the various cultural uses of plants. Having said that, Maca is a plant of great interest to ethnobotanist. Its history of use even dates back to the pre-Incan Andean tribes and the Incas as a way to energize during combat. They believed that the root gave them courage and vitality. There is so much information on the history of Maca and other ethnobotanicals, that you could spend your entire life learning new things without knowing it all.

Phytochemical Constituents
( Science )

                    Ok everyone, let's clear some smoke here. Too many people believe that there is "no science" behind herbal medicine. The truth is quite the opposite. Chemistry is science. Phytochemistry, to be more specific, is a branch of chemistry that seeks to discover and research medicinal and psychoactive pharmacological phytochemicals from plants.

So what's really happening when it comes to using botanicals such as Maca as a medicine? When plants harness the suns energy during the process of phytosynthesis it fuels biological processes from within. All of the plants chemical constituent parts are constructed using organic resources made available by their environment. Molecules of water and air are literally transformed into organic compounds. These chemicals are literally collaborations of atoms. They are created in accordance to the genetic program which exist innately in the plants DNA ( Deoxyribonucleic acid )

Maca contains the following:

Benzylated derivative of 1,2-dihydro-N-hydroxypyridine, named macaridine, together with the benzylated alkamides (macamides), N-benzyl-5-oxo-6E,8E-octadecadienamide and N-benzylhexadecanamide, as well as the acyclic keto acid, 5-oxo-6E,8E-octadecadienoic acid, macaridine and N-benzylhexadecanamide. 1,2-dihydro-N-hydroxypyridine derivative, macaridine, and the macamides, N-benzyl-5-oxo-6E,8E-octadecadienamide and N-benzylhexadecanamide, as well as 5-oxo-6E,8E-octadecadienoic acid.

It also contains uridine, malic acid, glucosinolates, glucotropaeolin, and m-methoxyglucotropaeolin. The specific molecule (1R,3S)-1-methyltetrahydro-carboline-3-carboxylic acid has been shown to effect the central nervous system.

Nutrition wise it's 60-75% carbohydrates, 10-14% protein, 8.5% dietary fiber, and 2.2% fats. Maca is rich in minerals such as calcium, potassium, iron, iodine, copper, manganese, and zinc. The root contains fatty acids, linolenic acid, palmitic acid, and oleic acids, and 19 amino acids. So you can see that it is in fact a scientifically researched plant.

Preparations and Dosages

                 Dosages are subjective. They vary from book to book, resource to resource, and can even be effected by the severity of the condition being treated. The most common way to prepare root based medicine is to make a decoction, or a tincture. Decoctions are the quickest way to prepare a medicine. You simply boil the root material for an extended period of time.

Tinctures extract both polar and non-polar constituents from plant matter. This is a step up from water because you are obtaining a wider range of medicinal and psychoactive alkaloids. They are made by soaking the root in high proof alcohol such as everclear ( at least 75% alcohol ). The mixture should soak for a minimum of one month. Shaking it up from time to time helps. From here, it can be stored in glass tincture bottles with droppers for use.

Where To Buy

Organic Lepidium meyenii

Buy Quality Maca Root Here!


By viewing this page you are by default agreeing to this sites disclaimer.

botanicals

INFORMATION PROVIDED ON OUR WEBSITE IS FOR BOTANICAL/CULTURAL RESEARCH PURPOSES ONLY! ANY REFERENCES ABOUT THE USE OR EFFECTS OF THESE NATURAL HEALING HERBS IS BASED ON TRADITIONAL USE OR SHAMANIC PRACTICES. ALL PRODUCTS ARE SOLD FOR ETHNOBOTANICAL RESEARCH (CONSULT YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER)! STATEMENTS AND ITEMS ARE NOT EVALUATED OR APPROVED BY THE FDA. NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, PREVENT, OR CURE, ANY AILMENTS, CONDITIONS, DISEASES, ETC.

References:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942201003958

Lepidium meyenii. (2016, March 6). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 18:04, March 8, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lepidium_meyenii&oldid=708632639

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