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Medicinal Uses

Potential hypocholesterolemic effects; Potential use in vaccines, immune response[odd],[1]; Cough, Bronchitis, Breathing Problems.[4]

Quillaia Bark Extract Facts

A lot of folks may not realize the industrial and economic importance of nature, or in this case specifically, plants. Quillaia saponaria is a plant that's a prime example of this. Another name for this type of useful botanical is "ethnobotanical". You've probably never heard the name Quillaia in your life, or maybe you have. The thing is, it's the source of Vanilla, which you probably do know about. Some interesting things to note about this stuff is that the last time I checked, it was listed as an ingredient in A&W Rootbeer. On that note, did you know that back in the day, root beer was made with Sassafras root, a natural source of MDA? This herb on the other hand creates high amounts of chemicals called saponins, among others. According to research found via scholar.google.com, "Saponins may in part, account for the hypocholesterolemic effects produced by saponins and plants that produce it."[1] I found this fact peculiar. It's not every day you read about a natural extract straight from an herb being put in something like soda. You would imagine this being more of a health store type of ingredient. I'm implying nothing by saying this other than my sense of being taken aback.


Supposedly this stuff has a lot more sapponins than some plants. In other words, it has high concentrations of it. I've noticed while doing research and writing over the years that natural sources of this stuff which produce high amounts are often prized for something medicinally, in terms of herbal medicine or herbalism, and backed by phytochemistry in terms of containing active principles. Recurrence is a central theme in the plant kingdom. Phytochemicals recurr throughout different species, and in some they are more previlant than others. Each species does tend to produce its own unique chemicals in terms of alkaloids, compounds, etc. The scientist who name these tend to name unique, plant specific chemicals in a way that directly ties them to the actual scientific name of the species. An example to back up this statement is to point out that Passion flower produces something called passiflorine. See my point? So from what I see reading these academic journals, I conclude the obvious which is that despite the fact that multiple ethnobotanicals contain and produce saponins, the other phytochemicals they create are unique. The combination of the complex biologically created chemicals react differently to create unique properties to each specific herb.


Sapponins are also found in Yucca root. These are natural chemicals produced throughout the plant kingdom. They are used in traditional and modern medicine according to my sources.[2] Other academic research suggest that they, "have been found to have adjuvant effects on purified protein antigens."[3] "The structure of the actual chemicals are related to the adjuvant activities, and influence the nature of the immune responses."[3] What does all of this mean? I have no idea, because I'm not a scientist. The research goes on to simplify it by saying basically that, "they have potential to be used in design of new vaccines so as to induce a desired immune response."[3] All I know, is this is very interesting and it confirms that it's possible for this plant to be of some benefit. There are tons of other academic journals available through scholar.google.com, and it would take me a life time of blogs like this just to cover one or two statements on those journals. Yet, to this day, there are those who still believe that herbalism is un-scientific. The truth is, this couldn't be further from the truth thanks to research. It turns out, people were right.


Quillaia, or "the vanilla plant", is commonly believed to be good for cough, bronchitis, and other breathing problems. Others apply it to the skin as a topical medicine, athletes foot(gross), and itchy scalp(bleck!). It has a nickname "soapbark" because of its use in shampoo and soap, etc. Another one called Yucca has the same holistic / industrial use as well. The thing about industrial applications, is there's always a DIY way to utilize those resources as well. I encourage America to do so, and the world! I'm not saying it works but this is commonly believed by the herbalist community. I'm not saying it's b.s. either. We need to protect its legality and the businesses that keep natural supplements around though. There have been some issues involving companies being cut off from credit card processing for selling certain producuts, one being Kratom, an herb from Asia. Stand up for your freedom, legally and peacefully. Don't loose!


I think the ultimate point of this article is that there is a lot of good information the public is not being exposed to on a main-stream level. I think society should be embracing phytochemical medicine as a whole. Instead, I witness would appears to be some sort of "leaving out" of what's important in our cultures, and/or false stereotypes which are essentially lies, regarding herbalism to be un-scientific, which is simply not true. Phytochemistry IS the science that verifies herbalisms potential. I wish the world could come to this realization and put an end to medical fascism. The baker act forcers victims to be hospitalized against their will. Please take up activism in order to protect the American people from tyranny. The information provided herein demonstrates clear evidence that these types of plants and industry are connected. It would make sense that big profiteers didn't want the world to know about the epic nature of the plant kingdoms phytochemical pharmacy. Below is a list of the phytochemicals produced by Quillaia that I know of alone, there are most likely more. There are also links to other resources on those chemicals below.


Phytochemical Constituents: saponins[1]

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By being here or placing an order you are by default agreeing to this sites legal and precautionary disclaimer.


INFORMATION PROVIDED ON OUR WEBSITE IS FOR ETHNOBOTANICAL/CULTURAL RESEARCH PURPOSES ONLY! ANY REFERENCES ABOUT THE USE OR EFFECTS OF THESE NATURAL HEALING HERBS IS BASED ON TRADITIONAL USE OR SHAMANIC PRACTICES. ALL PRODUCTS ARE SOLD FOR ETHNOBOTANICAL RESEARCH (CONSULT YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDER)! STATEMENTS AND ITEMS ARE NOT EVALUATED OR APPROVED BY THE FDA. NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, PREVENT, OR CURE ANY AILMENT, CONDITION, DISEASE, ETC. IF YOU'RE INTERESTED IN AFFILIATE MARKETING THESE PRODUCTS. REMEMBER TO USE ETHICAL HERBALISM IN YOUR CONTENT. I DO GET PAID BY AMAZON LLC AND OTHER AFFILIATE PROGRAMS FOR PLACING PROFITABLE ADS ON THIS SITE IN WHICH I EARN INCOME WHEN YOU CLICK THEM AND OR MAKE A PURCHASE THANK YOU.



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