Xhosa Root [ Silene capensis ]

(African Dream Root)


     Xhosa dream root is an oneirogen. It's a perennial plant native to Eastern South Africa. There, it's regarded as a sacred plant with the remarkable power to induce vivid and prophetic lucid dreams. It has often been referred to by the name of "Ubulawu". Often times Silene capensis is described to be more powerful than even Calea Zacatechichi, or even the African Oneirogen ( Entada rheedii ). Note that there are quite a few of these types of herbs, and not too many of them are known for this type of classification. Thanks to a large number of books on different cultures, I'm proudly bringing this knowledge to the mainstream today.


A very small amount of the root is needed for desired effects. It can be boiled ( a decoction ), ground into a powder and eaten, or made into a tincture. It has a very bitter taste when eaten. A decoction or tincture is more bearable. The taste can easily be modified by using Cinnamon, Ginger, and other flavorable herbs. The reason I suggest this addition is because Ginger root is believed to aid in digestion and can enhance the infusion. The art of synergy and symbiosis is prevalent in herbalism. It's something you'll gain more and more insight into as you gain experience. This website is a great place to learn such insightful acquisitions. In regards to the Cinnamon, it's said to remove plaque from arteries and benefit the brain. I challenge anyone to further research my statements via scholar.google.com


Although the roots of Xhosa were traditionally used as an oneirogen or "plant ally" to induce lucid dreams and enhance overall dreaming, I like to use all parts of the plant including the beautiful white flowers. You can capture some incredible oils from the fresh organic material, also known as "essential oils". I find the flowers are also useful in tinctures and infusions of an oneirogen type nature. In the next paragraph, I'll talk more about capturing those oils! It's an incredible experience getting to use fresh oil from this plant. You never read about this anywhere else on the internet as people only focus on one part. I believe the entire essence of the herb is important as a whole.

Xhosa Essential Oils


Xhosa flowers are beautiful or "dreamy", and have a nice tame fragrance to them. They are bright, white, and resemble the appearance of black berry flowers. They have this sort of "glow" that almost speaks to you. There are two ways to go about this, one is ghetto, the other is expensive. You can use water and flower, or you can buy steam distillation systems. The kits come with instructions. For the ghetto method, take your freshly harvested flowers, and simply add them to water in a mason jar. Let them set, squeeze out the oils and wait. Once everything has settled, you can get a dropper and carefully suck up the oils right off the top of the water! Remember, oil and water don't mix! Another option is to use a steam distillation system.


Growing Xhosa

In general these Xhosa plants are very easy to cultivate. Don't worry about over watering Xhosa ( Silene capensis ). This plant loves and requires water more than most other plants. You can water them once in the morning, and by the end of the day they may require to be watered even more. Generally, water once to twice per day. There are exceptions to this rule so use common sense. If they begin to wilt, water immediately. They are not easily cultivated via clones or cuttings. You can over do it and kill them so be careful. I have no idea why but on the bright side the Xhosa seed are easy enough to germinate. Start them in a small pot indoors and cover with a thin layer of soil. Use some good rich organic soil with excellent drainage. Perlite can be added to improve drainage and airation. Later this year I will add some high quality images of some live Xhosa plants.


Constituent Effects
The effects are from my experiences, vivid, colorful, and more complex, crystal clear dreams. They tend to have more of a psychedelic nature to them under its influence. In general, the phytochemicals commonly suspected to cause the oneirogenic effects are called triterpenoid saponins. I disagree with this belief yet I could be wrong. I think some other phytochemical is responsible. A lot of plants contain saponins and not all of them are known oneirogens. Triterpenoid saponins are naturally occurring compounds that exist in multiple plants. The ability of the plants to create these pharmacological constituents is wired into their DNA ( Deoxyribonucleic acid ).

Tinctures
There are many oneirogen plants native to Africa. I decided to make an infused tincture out of several of them. The results were astounding. You can easily make your own infused tincture. First, select the plants of your choice. Choose plants with properties that should work synergistically with one another. Make sure that what you're using is legal where you live first, as I'm not encouraging illegal activity. In many regions of the world this stuff is legal, and often embraced. I don't see any reason they would make this one illegal though because it doesn't give you a buzz or anything. You can always get one ready made, by simply buying an Xhosa Tincture


After you have selected your herbs, you're ready to begin. Grind them up, and soak them in high proof alcohol ( preferably everclear, at least 75% alc ). Allow the mixture to soak for at least one month. Now the resulting extract can be filtered and added to glass bottles with droppers for use. Store them in a cool, dark place. You can also steam distill the oils from the alcohol. The remaining organic matter can be bushed to ashes and filtered through acidified alcohol to extract the plant salts. If you're not a skilled professional, it's better off just buying a high quality ready made preparation. Don't try this at home folks. Suggested recipe? Ginger, Xhosa, Nutmeg, Calea Z, Blue Lotus & Kratom. The Nutmeg and lotus should be the smallest quantity in the mixture. Check out where to buy this product via my Shops section Thanks for your contributions!


Organic Xhosa Dream Herb Scientific Name: Silene capensis


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